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Old 17-02-16, 10:10 AM
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Default A day at Scarborough

I thought I would post about a recent visit to Scarborough, to try to get people to post on here, hope this is ok, Well to us Scarborough and Bridlington our our nearest coast, and after seeing a few postings on other forums I decided to have a trip over to Scarborough. We parked near the front, which is something you cannot do in summer, as we walked towards the harbour, we could see the white horses out to sea, as the past few days they had had a few strong squalls, and all the boats were tied up,the first bird we spotted was a winter plumaged Guillemot, never seen one like that before, just near it was a young seal asleep, it had obviously come in to rest, along the front we came cross the Tardis, bu no sign of the Doctor ?? near the fish chandlers we spotted a few Turnstones, lot of them with legs full of rings, this is something I personally do not like to see, why the B.T.O. people cannot just put 1 metal and perhaps one colour coded ring, on them for research I cannot, understand, and the one with the stick out tag is in my opinion dangerous for the bird, no doubt I will be shot down in flames. I know a lot has been learnt from ringing, but I find this upsetting. A few greater black backed gulls, but although we did nor spot any off the rarities that had been seen over the past weeks, it was still a great day in one of our favorite spots.
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day-scarborough-b-h-gull-resize.jpg   day-scarborough-cormarant-resize.jpg   day-scarborough-guillimot-resize.jpg   day-scarborough-mending-cages-resize.jpg   day-scarborough-seal-asleep-resize.jpg  

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Old 17-02-16, 10:12 AM
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Just a couple more, hope this looks ok.
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day-scarborough-swans-head-resize.jpg   day-scarborough-tardis-resize.jpg   day-scarborough-turnstone-rings-resize.jpg   day-scarborough-turnstone-wall-resize.jpg  
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Old 18-02-16, 08:58 PM
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Well I had a look tonight on who was on line. 5 members but no one posted or answered ????
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Old 18-02-16, 09:30 PM
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Great photo's and I think it maybe just you and me posting at the moment we'll have to see how it goes when the weather picks up and spring arrives.
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Old 19-02-16, 06:54 AM
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Thanks Adrian, cannot understand whats happened.
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Old 19-02-16, 10:46 AM
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I am wondering if something as gone on that we ain't involved in but must admit it does seem really quiet on the thread but it appears people are reading the threads
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Old 19-02-16, 10:38 PM
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Nope, you're not the only ones posting, but it has been strikingly quiet on here since Christmas. Most notable absentees are Peter B (he has posted to say he's been very busy), and Judith Little Sparrow. I'm actually starting to get a bit worried that things are not well with Judith; such a long absence is unprecedented during my time on the forum. Anybody know of anything of her circumstances?

As regards your day at Scarborough - one of my favourite seaside towns too - I've never found it to be particularly successful birding-wise. And I do agree that all those leg rings are worrying, especially that hideous spurred affair. Nasty! Mind you, with Flamborough and Bempton so close I rely on Scarborough (and Bridlington) for fish 'n chips rather than birds .

I read every post on this forum, sooner or later (except Neil's posts on what's about in Cornwall ), but not all posts require a comment. I'll continue to read, and post on here, and hope that its present moribund state is a reflection of quiet birding times rather than lack of interest.

Hang in there.

Tony
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Old 20-02-16, 07:56 AM
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Hi Tony brid & Scarborough can be quite good for unusual birds, at this time of year, they have had quite a few divers, over the past few weeks, best fish & chips are in Filey.
Must agree it is worrying regarding Little Sparrow who is the most prolific poster, perhaps Peter could PM to find out, if he can ??. Hope your problems are all sorted.
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Old 20-02-16, 09:21 PM
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The number of people posting on forums like this will always have ups and downs, and even people who are too busy to post are likely to dip in occasionally to read posts that have been made by others.


Now, regarding colour ringing, this isn't you being 'shot down in flames', rather a very brief explanation of why a metal ring and a single colour ring are not suitable for most studies:
Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkeye View Post
near the fish chandlers we spotted a few Turnstones, lot of them with legs full of rings, this is something I personally do not like to see, why the B.T.O. people cannot just put 1 metal and perhaps one colour coded ring, on them for research I cannot, understand
The numbered combinations that are used on metal rings can not be read in the field, so if only a metal ring and a single coloured ring were used the number of possible combinations would be severely limited . For each colour of coloured ring available the combinations possible would be as follows: (1) metal ring on left leg, coloured on right. (2) metal ring on right leg, coloured on left. (3) metal ring on left leg with coloured ring above it, also on left leg. (4) metal ring on left leg with coloured ring below it, also on left leg. (5) metal ring on right leg with coloured ring above it, also on right leg. (6) metal ring on right leg with coloured ring below it, also on right leg.
There are a limited number of colours that can be used because of peoples perceptions of colour, the fact that some colours can fade over time and end up looking like other colours, etc. If we say that 8 colours are useable (the number available from the BTO), and assume that up to 75% of all birds ringed will later be reported (probably too high a figure), the maximum sample size would be up to 75% of the possible ringing combinations (6 x 8 = 36), so reports would be received for a maximum of 36 individuals (48 if all were reported again).
In reality, one of the coloured rings available (black) is rarely used because it, perhaps surprisingly, isn't reliably discernible in the field, and the reporting rate is more likely to be somewhere between 22-60% at best. This gives a potential sample size of 9-25 (with a maximum of 42) - a total that is highly unlikely to produce any scientifically significant results for most studies.
Serious studies will typically require the marking of 100s of individuals, if not 1000s, if they want reasonable numbers of individuals to be subsequently reported..
Increasing the number of rings, and adding 'flags' dramatically increases the number of potential combinations available.

Increasing the number of rings used greatly increases the number of possible combinations (e.g. there are 38 combinations using 3 rings, even if only 2 colours + the metal ring are used).

There is no evidence that ringing techniques currently in use adversely affect the survival of the birds involved. Whenever there have been harmful effects to be birds identified, that are caused by ringing or other marking techniques, these techniques have been stopped, or changed to remove the negative effects.If this wasn't done it would affect the scientific value of the results of most studies.

This won't change the opinions of anyone who is strongly against ringing, but hopefully it will help to explain why combinations of several rings are used in colour ringing studies.
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Old 20-02-16, 10:08 PM
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Our local ringing group have done a colour ringing scheme on the Avocets that have bred on our local reserve,quite interesting to see where they wander to. I have never seen them close up as shown on Hawkeyes pictures but the plastic ones fitted to the Turnstone look a bit like a plastic version of the ones used years ago on fighting cocks,hope they are not as viscous as they look.

Last edited by dales birder; 20-02-16 at 10:14 PM.
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